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Newsflash No.35 - May 24, 2017

Important information sent out to students on a biweekly basis, including information, reminders, opportunities and news from the Faculty and elsewhere.

A collection of events, seminars, information and opportunities for master’s students in English that are being held primarily at the Faculty of Social Science.

 

Contents:

 

News from Graduate School & Faculty of Social Sciences

  • Graduate School opening hours during Ascension Day long weekend (Read more HERE)

  • Information for the 2017 Faculty of Social Sciences Master Graduation Ceremony (Read more HERE)

  • Doctoral Studentship in Political Science, special focus (BECC) (Read more HERE)

  • Seminar: Cultural heritage/ May 30th (Read more HERE)

  • Seminar: Women’s rights as gendered temperance: Institutional and everyday perspectives on gender, security and violence against women/ May 31st (Read more HERE)

  • Open Lecture: Thinking of Interviews and Stories as Narrative Practice/ May 31st (Read more HERE)

  • Developmental Research Day/ June 1st (Read more HERE)

  • Seminar: Quantum Mind and Social Science/ June 7th (Read more HERE)

  • Seminar: Climate state/Welfare state/ June 14th (Read more HERE)

  • Seminar: Social welfare policy in the US in the Era of Trump/ June 19th (Read more HERE)

 

External News & Events

  • Lecture: Radiation coming from the sky; what is it and where does it come from?/ May 30th (Read more HERE)

  • Lecture: The dynamics of minority-majority relations in Europe: Emerging paradigm shift, or old wine in new bottles?/ May 31st (Read more HERE)

  • Lecture: Orchids and Dandelions (Orchidée- och maskros-barn): How We Differ in Our Susceptibility to the Environment/ June 1st (Read more HERE)

  • Lecture: A Tear Jerker: The Impact of Infant Crying/ June 1st (Read more HERE)

  • CIRCLE Seminar Series - Marco Vivarelli/ June 7th (Read more HERE)

  • Symposium About the Future of Life Concept/ June 14th (Read more HERE)

  • Webinar from Sweden's Public Employment Agency: How to write a cover letter and CV/ June 21st (Read more HERE)

 

Other News, Events & Opportunities

  • Gender Troublemakers open panel discussion: Feminism: between activism and academia/ May 24th (Read more HERE)

  • MUSA brown bag seminar: "Regulating Residence: An inquiry into the governance of Roma EU-citizens in Malmö"/ May 28th (Read more HERE)

  • DIIS conference: Sex, migration and new world (dis)order (Read more HERE)

  • MUSA brown bag seminar: "Working title: Swedish match? Education and employment integration in Sweden"/ June 7th (Read more HERE)

  • DIIS seminar: Japan's security renaissance/ June 19th (Read more HERE)

  • Summer programme at Charles University in Prague: Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty/ Sep 9th - Sep 23rd, 2017 (Read more HERE)

 

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News from Graduate School & Faculty of Social Sciences in Details

 

The Graduate School office will be closed Thursday, May 25th and Friday, May 26th, and reopen its doors on Monday, May 29th. 

Thank you for your interest in participating in the 2017 Faculty of Social Sciences Master Graduation Ceremony!

The response was unprecedented, and this year’s ceremony will be the biggest yet! All students should carefully read the Graduation Ceremony Guide available on the Graduate School Website:http://graduateschool.sam.lu.se/about/regular-events/graduation-ceremony... guide covers most of the practical details surrounding the ceremony.

The following information is a supplement to the guide and outlines details specific to this year’s ceremony.

 

Guests

-The application closed on May 8th at 12:00 for most programmes, the exception being for Political Science and Human Ecology, which closed on May 10th at 12:00. If you have signed up for the ceremony after the deadline for your programme, you will be allowed to attend the ceremony, but unfortunately we will not be able to accommodate any of your guests.

-For those who signed up before their deadline, you will get the number of guests that you requested up to 2 guests. If you signed up for 0 guests, you have been allotted 0 guests, if you have signed up for 1 guest, you get 1, if 2, then 2. In order to ensure that each student who signed up in time can bring guests, we will not be able to accommodate any requests for more than two guests. If you submitted more than one application, we have accepted your most recent one.

-As noted, there is a maximum occupancy in the auditorium which cannot be exceeded. Because of the unusually large response from graduating students this year, we also have a unusually large number of guests. As of now, there are more guests than there is space for in the auditorium, so we have arranged for an extra room in the university building which will be live streaming the ceremony on a large screen. Guests of students who have not submitted their thesis may be placed in the auxiliary viewing room. This will be determined by random selection. On Thursday, May 25th, we will notify students whose guests will have been assigned to the viewing room.

 

Tickets

- All guests will be issued tickets in advance which will indicate the room assignment. Students must pick up their guest tickets either from the Graduate School student reception desk or a pick-up point at Campus Helsingborg (time and location TBA). Please bring an official photo ID. 
 

The Graduate School reception desk is located in Gamla Kirurgen, Sandgatan 3, located on the 2nd floor, and will be open:

Monday, May 29th, 10-13.

Wednesday, May 31st, 10-13.

Campus Helsingborg programme students will pick up their tickets in Helsingborg. Details TBA.

 

-You are responsible for issuing these tickets to your guests. Tickets will not be replaced if lost. Last minute trading of tickets is not allowed.

- If at any time you realize that you will no longer be using your guest tickets, please let us know as soon as possible.

 

Photos

- Plan to be available for photos as early as 8:30 a.m. The photo schedule will be announced in the coming week.  
 

Again, please be sure to read through the Student Guide: http://graduateschool.sam.lu.se/about/regular-events/graduation-ceremony. It contains answers to many common questions relating to the ceremony.

 

 

The PhD programme in political science consists of 240 credits (equivalent to four years of full-time studies) and is concluded with the public defence of a doctoral thesis. The appointed doctoral student will receive a salary from the University, and the student's primary obligation is to complete the PhD studies. The position may involve departmental duties, mainly in the form of teaching, up to 20 per cent of full time working hours, in which case the appointment will be extended by the equivalent number of hours. The doctoral student will have access to a work space at the Department of Political Science. The terms of employment for doctoral students are regulated in the Swedish Higher Education Ordinance (HF), Chapter 5, Sections 1– 7.

The doctoral student shall be present and actively participate in the research and teaching environment at the department as well as in the activities conducted within the BECC research network. The main language of the PhD programme is English. However, non-Swedish speaking students are expected to acquire basic skills in Swedish during the period of employment. There are opportunities to participate in language courses taught at the University. The doctoral studentship will commence on 1 September 2017. The general syllabus and other information about the PhD programme in Political Science is available at: http://www.svet.lu.se/en/education/phd-studies.

Last application date: May 31st, 2017, 11:59 PM CET
For more information: https://lu.mynetworkglobal.com/en/what:job/jobID:149661/where:4/

 

 

Seminar on cultural heritage. All are welcome, but please contact Ted Svensson if you wish to participate: ted.svensson [at] svet.lu.se.

Programme

Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by approx. 20 minutes discussion.

9.15-9.50 Martin Hall (Department of Political Science), ‘The Politics of World Heritage’

9.50-10.25 Matthew Norris (Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences), ‘Conservation, Restoration, Reproduction: A Study in the Prehistory of Cultural Heritage in Early Modern Europe’

10.25-10.40 Coffee break

10.40-11.15 Katherine Burlingame (Department of Human Geography), ‘The Extraordinary Ordinary: A Phenomenological Model of Locale, Story, and Presence in Non-Monumental Heritage Landscapes’

11.15-11.50 Annika Björkdahl (Department of Political Science), ‘Cultural Heritage: Tangible and Intangible Legacy of Conflict’

11.50-12 Concluding reflections

Date: May 30th, 2017
Time: 09:00 - 12:00
Venue: Department of Political Science, large conference room, third floor.
For more information, contact: ted.svensson [at] svet.lu.se

 

 

Nicole George, University of Queensland present a paper entitled: Women’s rights as gendered temperance: Institutional and everyday perspectives on gender, security and violence against women. Nicole George, Snr Lecturer in Peace and Conflict Studies and International Relations, School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland

Abstract: For many women, experiences of familial, conjugal and other forms of gendered violence are sources of stigma and shame.  Fears of the “abandonment” (Hengeholm 2011) that women will suffer if these experiences are made public often mean they are silenced. A remedy to that situation was seemingly promised in 1993 when UN member states recognised this violence as a violation of women’s human rights, bringing it “into the arena of state accountability” (UN SG Report 2006, ii).  In the intervening years, an abundance of reform suggests states are more inclined than ever to recognise obligations to better protect and support women exposed to gendered violence and to respond more seriously to those who perpetrate this violence. But two observations suggest the need for circumspection when assessing the dividends of these reforms.  First it is hard to detect a remarkable change, much less diminishment in global and/or local incidence rates of gendered violence in the wake of these reform.  Second, findings from feminist criminology continue to show that even when states enact policy and legislative reform on violence against women, the tendency for women to blame themselves when they are exposed to violence remains. Together, these observations suggest we need to ask more probing questions than we have to date, about the institutional conditions that mediate processes of regulatory reform on violence against women, and how these reforms consequently become meaningful for the women whose security is at stake.  In this paper, I develop answers to these questions through empirical study of the impacts and implementation of policy reform on gender violence in three Pacific Island countries, Fiji, Bougainville and New Caledonia.  My findings show that although different configurations of regulatory authority in each case have implications for how reform is enacted and implemented, these innovations tend to do little to challenge the ways that violence, as a form of gendered coercive control, remains an ongoing feature of the regulatory environment too.  Further, my results show that in these circumstances, women tend to nominate strategies of “self-policing”, as the key, and sometimes only, means at their disposal to manage possible exposure to gendered violence. This suggests, somewhat disturbingly, that the principle of women’s “right” to security, is mediated through everyday “relations of ruling” in these contexts not as an idea that encourages women’s to expect protection from violence, but as a further gendered obligation that women shoulder to temper their own behaviour so as to avoid violence.

Date: May 31st, 2017
Time: 13:00 - 15:00
Venue: ED367 Large Conference Room, Eden, Paradisgatan 5, hus H, Lund
For more information, contact: annika.bjorkdahl [at] svet.lu.se

 

 

Welcome to an open lecture held on the occasion of Professor Jaber F Gubrium, sociologist and professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia, visiting Lund to receive his honorary doctorate.

Gubrium’s research is characterised by theore-tical and methodological innovation and deve-lopment. He has contributed to new research approaches in qualitative interview methods, narrative analysis, narrative ethnography and discourse analysis.

He has also contributed to discussions on sociology of knowledge with significant international impact.

The lecture is open to all who are interested. Welcome!

Date: May 31st, 2017
Time: 13:15 - 15:00
Venue: Pangea, Geocentrum (Hus II), Sölvegatan 12
For more information: katarina.jacobsson [at] soch.lu.se

 

 

At 10.15-11.45:

Doctor Honoris Causa, Professor Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg: Orchids and Dandelions - How We Differ in Our Susceptibility to the Environment

Some children and adults exposed to adversities suffer long-term negative consequences, whereas others develop relatively unscathed. Do individuals who are especially sensitive to environmental risks also benefit most from supportive environments? And what makes these ”orchids” more susceptible, whereas “dandelion” children seem to be unaffected?

Differential Susceptibility Theory paved the way for a radically new approach to the interplay between nature and nurture and its effect on human development. Correlational and experimental research, some of it carried it out in our lab, has provided support for the theory and identified specific markers of differential susceptibility. Thorny questions on mechanisms and ethical implications still remain.

At 13:15-15:00:

Professor Marinus H. van IJzendoorn: A Tear Jerker - The Impact of Infant Crying

Infant crying elicits our empathy and drives us nuts. It alerts parents to the needs of the infant, but persistent infant crying has also been documented as a major trigger of maltreatment. But how do we perceive, interpret, and react to infant crying? What roles do gender, parenting experience, and oxytocin levels play in explaining the variance in reactivity to infant crying?

Together with Doctor Honoris Causa Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg and a team of Ph. D. students, Professor Marinus Van IJzendoorn has been studying the impact of infant crying at several levels of parental functioning: intended behavioral responses, handgrip strength, hormonal responses, and neural activation, moderated by genotype or child experiences. One of the themes throughout this series of studies is the way in which cognitive interpretations of acoustically similar crying sounds elicit diverging behavioral and neural

Date: June 1st, 2017
Time: 10:15 - 15:00
Venue: Palaestra et Odeum (lower auditorium), 223 50 Lund, Sweden
For more information, contact Elia.Psouni [at] psy.lu.se

 

 

Professor Alexander Wendt, at Ohio State University presents his new book Quantum Mind and Social Science (Cambridge University Press 2015).

Alexander Wendt is Mershon Professor of International Security and Professor of Political Science at The Ohio State University.  He received his PhD in 1989 from the University of Minnesota, and before coming to OSU in 2004 had taught previously at Yale University, Dartmouth College, and the University of Chicago.

Wendt is interested in philosophical aspects of social science, with special reference to international relations.  He is the author of several well-known journal articles, as well as Social Theory of International Politics (Cambridge, 1999), which in 2006 received the International Studies Association award for “Best Book of the Decade” in the field.  In the 2013 TRIP survey of 1400 International Relations scholars he was named as the most influential scholar in the field over the past 20 years.

Wendt's new book, Quantum Mind and Social Science (Cambridge, 2015), explores the implications for social science of the possibility that consciousness is a macroscopic quantum mechanical phenomenon – in effect, that human beings are walking wave functions. He is also co-editor of International Theory (Cambridge), which he co-founded with Duncan Snidal to bring together scholarship from international relations theory, international legal theory,and international political theory.

Date: June 7th, 2017
Time: 13:00 - 15:00
Venue: ED367 Large Conference Room, 3rd floor, Eden (Department of Political Science), Paradisgatan 5, house H, Lund
For more information, contact: annika.bjorkdahl [at] svet.lu.se

 

 

Peter Christoff, Melbourne university will give a seminar on the topic Climate state/Welfare state.

Moderator: Annica Kronsell

Date: June 14th, 2017
Time: 13:15 - 14:45
Venue: ED367 Large Conference Room, Eden, Paradisgatan 5, hus H, Lund
For more information, contact: annika.bjorkdahl [at] svet.lu.se

 

 

Professor Mimi Abramovitz from Hunter College- Silberman School of Social Work in New York, will talk about: Social welfare policy in the US in the Era of Trump

At Hunter College Mimi Abramovitz teaches Social and Welfare Policy at master and PhD-level. She is also running a research project on Privatization and Managerialism in the Human Services: Implications for Social Work Practice. You can read more about her at: http://sssw.hunter.cuny.edu/ssw/staff-members/abramovitz-mimi-d-s-w/

Please inform Teres Hjärpe teres.hjarpe [at] soch.lu.se if you plan on attending the seminar.

Date: June 19th, 2017
Time: 14:30 - 15:30
Venue: Room 10, Bredgatan 26, Lund
For more information, contact: teres.hjarpe [at] soch.lu.se

 

 

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External News & Events in Details

 

Since their discovery in the 1920s, high-energy radiation originating outside our Solar System have played a crucial role in particle physics, cosmology and astroparticle physics. Over the years, these cosmic rays have given us important hints about the fundamental constituents of matter,  they are studied in detail to shed light on open questions in the understanding of our universe, and they are used to commission the operation of particle detectors. This talk will provide an overview of cosmic radiation, its origins and its implications for particle physics as well as cosmology and astroparticle physics.

Date: May 30th, 2017
Time: 10:30 - 11:15
Venue: Rydbergssalen, fysiska institutionen (H-huset), Professorsgatan 1

 

 

This lecture by Prof. Tove Malloy, Director of the European Centre for Minority Issues, will focus on ethno-cultural groups linked to the formation of the ‘nation-state’ system in Europe, i.e. religious, national and linguistic minorities.

Abstract: For more than a millennium, minority-majority relations have been part of every-day politics across Europe. History shows that kings, rulers, despots and later on democratic governments have had to manage minority-majority antagonisms within their midst. Induced by the rise of humanism, minority protection and minority governance have developed as diversity management tools over centuries in Europe to include not only religious and ethnic groups but also national, linguistic, racial, social, demographic and LGTB groups. Mechanisms have included domestic, bilateral and multilateral legal tools as well as policies. ‘Regimes’ have formed around political aims and historical necessities, such as security and justice. Recently, new discourses have formed in Europe around universal themes, such as cohesion and citizenship. While minority-majority relations are usually linked to the older approaches through analogies to conflict and protection, there is evidence that contemporary minority narratives speak to the new discourses. Through the lens of diversity management, the new discourses may be seen as aiming at stability and inclusion rather than state control as implied in the older approaches. In so doing, they are perhaps replacing the older notions of security and justice by democratizing minority-majority relations through new norm-setting. Alternatively, they may simply be reiterating the previous aims of state control cloaked in new contexts.

This lecture will focus on ethno-cultural groups linked to the formation of the ‘nation-state’ system in Europe, i.e. religious, national and linguistic minorities. All are non-dominant groups, not only in numbers but also in cultural practices and traditions, and they usually self-identify as not belonging to the majority nation, except in the civic sense of respecting peaceful co-existence. By tracing the formation of four discursive approaches to minority-majority relations in earlier and contemporary European history, and by exploring the contemporary narratives of ethno-cultural minority actors and actions, the lecture will discuss the legacy of peaceful co-existence as the predominant paradigm for minority-majority relations in democratizing societies in the 21st Century. It will question whether there is evidence of an emerging paradigm shift in minority-majority relations that might put us on a track of both a new understanding of diversity management and a new research agenda on ethno-cultural issues.

Date: May 31st, 2017
Time: 16:30 - 18:30
Venue: Pufendorf lecture hall, Lilla Gråbrödersgatan 3, Lund
For more information, contact: gabriel.stein [at] rwi.lu.se

 

 

Professor Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Centre for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University, The Netherlands. 2017 Faculty of Social Sciences Doctor Honoris Causa Lecture.

Some children and adults exposed to adversities suffer long-term negative consequences, whereas others develop relatively unscathed. Do individuals who are especially sensitive to environmental risk also benefit most from supportive environments? And what makes these "orchids" more susceptible, whereas “dandelion” children seem to be unaffected? Differential Susceptibility Theory paved the way for a radically new approach to the interplay between nature and nurture and its effect on human development. Correlational and experimental research, some of it carried it out in our lab, has provided support for the theory and identified specific markers of differential susceptibility. Thorny questions on mechanisms and ethical implications have still to be addressed.

Date: June 1st, 2017
Time: 10:15 - 11:45
Venue: Palaestra Nedre
For more information, contact: etzel.cardena [at] psy.lu.se

 

 

Professor Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Centre for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Infant crying elicits our empathy and drives us nuts. It alerts parents to the needs of the infant, but persistent infant crying has also been documented as a major trigger of maltreatment.

How do we perceive, interpret, and react to infant crying? What roles do gender, parenting experience, and oxytocin levels play in explaining the variance in reactivity to infant crying?

Together with doctor of honour Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg and a team of PhD students, Professor Marinus Van IJzendoorn have been studying the impact of infant crying at several levels of parental functioning: intended behavioral responses, handgrip strength, hormonal responses, and neural activation, moderated by genotype or child experiences.

One of the themes throughout this series of studies is the way in which cognitive interpretations of acoustically similar cry sounds create diverging behavioral and neural responses.

Date: June 1st, 2017
Time: 13:15 - 15:00
Venue: Palaestra Nedre
For more information: elia.psouni [at] psy.lu.se

 

 

Marco Vivarelli is  Full Professor of Economics at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment and skills; the labour market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

CIRCLE (Centre for Innovaiton, Research and Competence in the learning Economy) is an interdisciplinary center for innovation research at Lund University. The aim of CIRCLE is to understand and explain how innovation can contribute to a good society and tackle societal challenges like economic crises, climate change or increased globalization of economic activities.

Venue: June 7th, 2017
Time: 14:00 - 15:00
Venue: Circle Seminar Room
For more information, contact: palina.sauchanka [at] circle.lu.se

 

 

The Pufendorf research theme Plurality of Lives invites you to a symposium about the future of the life concept. The symposium will explore philosophical, ethical, societal, and legal questions concerning manipulated life, synthetic biology, artificial life, and astrobiology. It will provide an opportunity for researchers of various disciplines to meet and discuss research of mutual interest in the human conceptualisation of future life on Earth and beyond.

Program:

13:00–13:30  Introduction: Plurality of Lives
13:30–14:15  Sherryl Vint (University of California, Riverside, USA): Speculative Life: New Ontologies, Experimental Futures
14:15–15:00  Kelly Smith (Clemson University, USA): Life 2.0: How synthetic biology will transform our conception of nature
15:00–15:30  Coffee break
15:30–16:15  Fredrik Heintz (Linköping University, Sweden): AI-Enhanced Humans?
16:15–17:00  Jacques Arnould (CNES, France): Who goes there? Ethics and Extraterrestrial Life

Aims of the research theme: The main aims of the research theme Plurality of Lives are to initiate an interdisciplinary research initiative at Lund University on the status and effects on science, technology and the society, of the emergence (finding or inventing of) life with a different origin than life as we know it.

Date: June 14th, 2017
Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Venue: The Pufendorf Institute for Advanced Studies, Biskopsgatan 3
Registration: Registration deadline is June 7, but there is no registration fee.
To register, or for further questions, please contact: PI, Senior Lecturer Jessica Abbott. Email: jessica.abbott [at] biol.lu.se.

 

 

The way you write an application can vary from country to country. In this webinar we will discuss how to write a cover letter and CV when you apply for a job in Sweden. We will also give you tips on how to present your application professionally in order to catch a recruiter's eye.

This activity is a webinar, a seminar on the web. You participate in the webinar through your computer, tablet or smartphone. You need to have an internet connection but can sit where ever you prefer. During the webinar you will see and hear the presenter. If you participate through a computer you can also ask questions through a chat. The webinar will be held in English.

Date: June 21st, 2017
Time: 13:00 - 14:15
To participate, register here: https://simplesignup.se/event/96113

 

 

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Other News, Events & Opportunities in Details

 

What is feminist activism? What are the links between feminist activism and academia? Is there a separation between the two spaces or not? Can academia be considered a form of activism? What are the collisions between 'academics' and 'activists'? What collaborations should be created or enhanced?

Gender Troublemakers invites you to be part of the open panel “Feminism: between activism and academia” to discuss these and other questions. We are looking for anyone thinking or working on these issues who is interested in sharing their experience. You don’t need to be an expert, but if you have an interest in the topic or have some experience in activism or academia in relation to feminism, please send us a short email!

This open panel will celebrate the closing of a successful year of gender and feminist related activities organized by the collective “Gender Troublemakers”. Whether you want to be panellist or assistant, we encourage you to come, invite others and have a good time with us!

Everyone is welcome!

Date: May 24th, 2017
Time: TBA
For more information: https://www.facebook.com/thegendertroublemakers

 

Discussant: Mustafa Dikec, University of London

Internal reading group:  Jonas Alwall, US, Anna Lundberg, IMER, Mikael Spång, IMER

Date: May 29th, 2017
Time: 12:15 - 14:00
Venue: Malmö University, Niagara, NIC0826
For more information: http://www.mah.se/musa

 

 

DIIS and Barnard College, New York, are delighted to host this international conference connecting migration, gender and sexuality to recent populist uprisings and changing dynamics and meanings of neoliberalism or post-neoliberalism.

The conference brings together a distinguished group of international scholars addressing these issues in multiple national and transnational contexts. Drawing on research in countries such as the USA, UK, EU, Nigeria, Argentina, Mexico, The Caribbean and Hong Kong, the invited speakers analyze the following questions among others:

How might we understand migration, gender and sexuality in light of Trump, Brexit and Le Pen?

How can these current political transformations be read in terms of the movement of bodies and capital across borders?

How might we understand phenomena as different as human trafficking, sex work migration, marriage migration, deportation, asylum, anti-immigration sentiments and intensified border control in light of these recent global and political transformations?

How are these transformations reflected and understood in different contexts across the world?

The conference, which is jointly organised by DIIS and Barnard College, New York, is a full day event incl. free sandwich lunch, coffee and drinks served at DIIS.

The conference is the concluding conference for the research project “Gender, Justice and Neoliberalism”.

Participation is free of charge, but registration is required. Please use our online registration form no later than Wednesday 31 May 2017 at 12.00 noon.

Date: June 1st, 2017
Time: 10:00 - 16:30
Venue: Danish Institute for International Studies, Auditorium, Gl. Kalkbrænderi Vej 51A, 2100 Copenhagen
For more information: https://www.diis.dk/en/event/sex-migration-and-new-world-disorder


 

Opponent: Benny Carlsson, Lund University

Internal reading group: Tuija Muhonen, Anders Wigerfelt

NOTE this is a different day and a different room than usual!

Date: June 7th, 2017
Time: 12:15 - 14:00
Venue: Malmö University, The seminar room on the 9th floor at Niagara
For more information: http://www.mah.se/musa

 

 

For decades after World War II, Japan chose to focus on soft power and economic diplomacy alongside a close alliance with the United States, eschewing a potential leadership role in regional and global security. Since the end of the Cold War, and especially since the rise of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Japan's military capabilities have resurged. In this analysis of Japan's changing military policy, Prof. Andrew L. Oros shows how a gradual awakening to new security challenges has culminated in the multifaceted ”security renaissance” of the past decade. Despite openness to new approaches, however, three historical legacies - contested memories of the Pacific War and Imperial Japan, postwar anti-militarist convictions, and an unequal relationship with the United States - continue to play an outsized role. Japan's future security policies will continue to be shaped by these legacies, which Japanese leaders have struggled to address.

Japan's "security renaissance" has enabled Japan's military to become more involved in the Asian region and global security. Moreover, Japan is the key US ally in Asia in a new presidential era when the role of allies is being called into question. As the third largest economy in the world and one of the world’s largest military spenders, what role will Japan play in regional affairs and in US-Asia policy? Prof. Andrew L. Oros will seek to answer these questions in relation to his new book, Japan’s Security Renaissance: New Policies and Politics for the 21st Century. This talk will examine the domestic and international factors that led to this change, and what is next for Japan and the region in an uncertain era.

Participation is free of charge, but registration is required. Please use our online registration form no later than Thursday 8 June 2017 at 12.00 noon.

Date: June 9th, 2017
Time: 14:00 - 15:30
Venue: Danish Institute for International Studies, Auditorium, Gl. Kalkbrænderi Vej 51A, 2100 Copenhagen
For more information: https://www.diis.dk/en/event/japans-security-renaissance

 

 

We would like to inform you and your students about our academic programme "Summer University Prague 2017: Understanding Europe in an Age of Uncertainty", taking place at Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic) during September 2017 (September 9 – 23).

The preliminary application deadline is June 22, 2017.

At this moment,about one half of the places has already been allocated to successful applicants, but the other half is still available.

This study programme is internationally acknowledged, successful participants will be given 10 ECTS credits.

For detailed information please see our official website http://summer-university.fsv.cuni.cz, Facebook page “Spring and Summer Universities Prague”

Price: 990 EUR¨, Includes tuition, social and cultural events, online reading materials, accommodation in the dormitory, breakfasts and lunches.

Date: September 9th - 23rd, 2017
Venue: Summer University 2017, Charles University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Smetanovo nabrezi 6, CZ–110 00 Praha 1, Czech Republic

 

 

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If you have events or information that you would like to include in the next newsflash, or would like to be removed from the recipient list, please contact master [at] sam.lu.se .

Visit our website to view previous newsflashes http://graduateschool.sam.lu.se/about/graduate-schools-newsflash and our previous newsletters: http://graduateschool.sam.lu.se/about/the-graduate-school-newsletter

 

Graduate School Staff

 

 

 

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